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Author Archive for: ‘Kerry’

  • Charlie Burk Remembers…

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    Charlie Burk remembered in 1919 Dorset that his father sold many items in the General Store, groceries, drugs and dry goods, too varied to name them all.

    The flour and sugar came in 100 pound bags, candy, ice cream and beer.   This beer was in quart size bottles that came in wooden cases.  The cases were used also to send the empties back to the wholesaler.  Charlie remembered wheeling many of these cases up from the main dock after they had been unloaded, and taking the empties back in the wheelbarrow, a necessary vehicle in those days.

    Gasoline and kerosene came in steel barrows and were rolled by hand from the dock to the store where they were emptied into tanks.

    On one side of the store they had an ice cream parlour, a barber shop, and a poolroom.

    The ice cream came in on the boat too, in ten gallon cans set inside a wooden container large enough to pack a considerable amount of ice around it to keep it frozen while shipping from Toronto.  It was put into their outside containers and repacked with ice and rock salt as soon as it arrived. This required a large amount of ice to be cut in the winter and stored in their ice house.

    Burk and Avery Store in the foreground on the right.

    Burk and Avery Store in the foreground on the right.

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  • Making Amends

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    MAKING AMENDS

    IN THE LATE NINETEEN NINETYS THE CLAYTON FAMILY RECEIVED A LETTER ADDRESSED TO THE

    ‘CLAYTONS OF DORSET’.  THE LETTER WAS FROM AN EIGHTY YEAR OLD GENTLEMAN WHO WAS

    FROM NEW YORK STATE.  THIS MAN HAD ATTENDED CAMP OTTER ON OTTER LAKE NEAR

    DORSET IN THE MID NINETEEN THIRTYS.  THE LETTER STATED THAT HE HAD STOLEN SOME

    CHOCOLATE BARS FROM THE CLAYTON FAMILY GENERAL STORE WHILE HIS TEENAGE FRIENDS

    HAD KEPT D.W. CLAYTON BUSY IN THE BACK OF THE STORE.  FOR SIXTY OR MORE YEARS HE

    HAD FELT BADLY ABOUT THIS.  THUS THE LETTER OF APOLOGY AND HE ENCLOSED A CHEQUE

    FOR TWENTY DOLLARS TO COVER  HIS THEFT.  HE WANTED TO FINISH HIS LIFE WITH A CLEAR

    CONSCIENCE.

    YOU CAN STOP IN AT THE DORSET HERITAGE MUSEUM TO VISIT OUR ‘GENERAL STORE’ EXHIBIT

    AND VIEW PICTURES AND ARTIFACTS OF CLAYTON’S STORE IN THE EARLY DAYS.  THE MUSEUM

    ALSO HAS AN EXHIBIT FEATURING AREA CAMPS, ONE OF WHICH IS CAMP OTTER.

    Camp Otter-lake-from-sandy-beach 2014

    Camp Otter view from their beach looking out on Otter Lake

  • Dorset Memories In the Early 1950’s

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    Remembered by Lorna Cassie – Bywater

    During my childhood around the age of eight, I recall summers spent in Dorset.  Our family, the Cassie Family, numbered nice in all.  My parents, George and Millie along with seven children ranging in age from three to nine (three girls and four boys) arrived the day after school finished in June and Dorset became our summer home for two glorious months of summer.  Summer ended for us on Labour Day Weekend.

    Before our own cottage was built on Otter Lake, we rented a small cottage on Lake of Bays from Mrs. McKey.  The McKey cottages were next door to Len Barry’s garage and many a penny was spent buying those coveted black licorice from the counter top jar at Len’s garage.  We swam, played, had picnics and frolicked away our days while Dad worked at Clayton’s General Store.  This was a summer job for Dad and an essential one that put food on the table for his family.  During the year, he was school principal in Massey.

    It was a regular occurrence for my siblings and me to run down the hill past the little yellow tea room and the Anglican Church to visit Dad at the store.  It was really Wes Clayton we hoped to see.  Wes doled out candies and ice cream cones unbeknownst to my dad.  We picked up our mail from the post office housed in the back corner of Clayton’s store.  A most treasured tie was accompanying Dad in the old Clayton truck that delivered groceries to cottagers around the area.  On day when it was my turn to ride in the truck, we hit a bump on an old gravel side road causing the door on my side to fly open.  Dad’s quick arm grabbed hold of me, saving me from certain road rash that day.  We loved watching cars gas up from the old tanks that stood for years in front of Clayton’s store.

    Clayton's General Store

    Clayton’s General Store

     

    In my mind today, I still hear the creak of those old wood floor boards; I smell the chocolate from the ice cram counter and I hear Wes saying, ‘”Hi there, look how you’ve grown!” Clayton’s General Store is part of my lazy days of summer in the early 1950’s in the hamlet of Dorset.

  • Show Time at the Leslie Frost Centre

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    A past memoryfilm reel photo from Lorna Cassie – Bywater…

    Wednesday evenings during July and August in the 1950’s were looked forward to with great anticipation by the kids in my family.  Our parents piled us all into their old station wagon for the drive to the Frost Centre.  A room was set up with folding chairs facing a large movie screen.  Each child tried to get a seat closest to the front row where we thought we’d have the best view.  Films for the family entertainment were projected onto the screen the moment the lights went out.  We sat entranced for an hour and a half watching cartoons, Lassie, Roy Rogers and even some educational National Film Board presentations on Lakes and Forest Life.  Whatever was shown we loved and never complained.

    After all, movie night was free!  What more could a child possibly ask for?  Frost Centre

  • More Short Stories…

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    THE GILMOUR TRAMWAY

    THE GILMOUR TRAMWAY IS A MAJOR STORY IN THE HISTORY OF LOGGING IN ONTARIO.  IT

    WAS A ONE OF A KIND ENGINEERING PROJECT.  THE ONLY SUCCESSFUL WAY TO FLOAT LOGS

    UPHILL.  UNFORTUNATELY IT WAS ABANDONED AFTER THREE YEARS.  PARTLY DUE TO

    MECHANICAL PROBLEMS BUT MAINLY CAUSED BY LACK OF WATER FOLLOWING TWO VERY DRY

    SUMMERS AND LOWER THAN USUAL SNOWFALL IN THE SAME WINTERS.  ALL THAT REMAINS

    TODAY IS THE STONE STEAM POWERHOUSE THAT HAS BEEN TURNED INTO A LOVELY SUMMER

    HOME AND THE REMAINS OF THE FOUNDATION FOR THE BASE OF THE POWERHOUSE FOR THE

    JACKLADDER THAT SITS BELOW THE NOW MARSHY TRAMWAY POND.

    A MODEL OF THE GILMOUR TRAMWAY IS ON DISPLAY AT THE DORSET HERITAGE MUSEUM.

    AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT THE MUSEUM IS TWO BOOKS WRITTEN ABOUT THE

    GILMOUR TRAMWAY.

    Tramway Diorama Exhibit

    Tramway Diorama Exhibit

  • Short Stories and Memories from the Dorset Heritage Museum

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    Dorset GarageDORSET’S FIRST MOTORIZED VEHICLE

    The International Harvesters truck was ordered from Toledo Ohio in 1913 by

    HIRAM BARRY.  It was number 802 to have been built.  It was shipped to Hamilton Ontario,

    and then sent on to Huntsville.  It arrived in Huntsville in February 1913.  It

    was such an occasion that the Huntsville Band was brought out to meet the new arrival.

    The new motor wagon was driven over the ice of Fairy and Peninsula Lakes,

    across the height of land between North and South Portage, then

    across the ice of the Lake of Bays to Dorset.

    two men traveled with the International, one to teach Mr. Barry to drive it, the

    other gentleman was to teach him how to fix it! The payment these two

    gentlemen wanted was to be taken on a few fishing trips; for they had read how

    great our lakes and area were for fishing and hunting.

    The main use for the International at that time was to cadge supplies into the

    Lumber Camps.

    Hiram Barry owned and operated Dorset’s first garage and his family still do today!

  • Heritage Day 2014

    Another Great Season!

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    IMG_3648 IMG_3650 IMG_3653Well another great season is finished here at the Dorset Heritage Museum. Lots of visitors, our highest ever!! Positive comments, and wonderful volunteers. Thanks to each and everyone!
    Now planning begins on next years exhibits, Heritage Day, and of course archiving new donated items. Next time we are open is on the Saturday of the Dorset Snowball, see you there!

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